AAAS, 10h00 – 11h30, Friday 15th February 2019, Washington DC, USA.

Session Summary:

This session spotlights what is happening right now in Europe, Japan and South Africa towards building and sustaining national, regional and global ties as the bedrock of science. While managing the world’s largest public R&I funds, speakers share a mandate to place discovery at the core of international politics. Their success is measured on creating the necessary knowledge, jobs and wealth to keep tax-payers happy, while supporting a trade climate favouring developing and least developed countries.

Science Forum South Africa
https://www.sfsa.co.za


11h00 – 12h30, Thursday 13th December 2018, Ruby Room, CSIR International Convention Centre, Pretoria, South Africa.

Abstract:

There are over 52 million cannabis, 6 million amphetamine-type stimulant (ATS), 3 million cocaine, 2 million opioid and 1.5 million ecstasy (MDMA) users in Africa today. With a clear pan-African focus, this high-level panel will evidence how the goal of a ‘drug-free world’ backed up by a ‘war on drugs’ anchored in ‘science’ and enshrined in the international drug control treaties is both naïve and dangerous. Naïve, in that prohibition has had little impact on drug use with the number of consumers increasing, particularly in the developing world. Dangerous, in that prohibition fuels inhuman and coerced drug treatments, massive incarcerations, extrajudicial killings and the death penalty in contravention of international law.


09h00 – 13h15, Monday 9th July 2018, Chamber of Commerce & Industry of Toulouse.

Organised by SciCom – Making Sense of Science, hosted by the Chamber of Commerce & Industry of Toulouse and facilitated by the International Network for Government Science Advice (INGSA) this select, but balanced, gathering of 35 key global influencers working at the industry & policy-making interface is planned as a summit-style, curtain-raiser to ESOF 2018.


13h30 – 14h45, Tuesday 10th July 2018, ESOF 2018 Toulouse.

Abstract:

This high-level panel bridges the 2017 launch of the Brussels Declaration to ongoing work towards its pan-African equivalent, the Cape Town Declaration to be launched at the World Science Forum in 2021. Why the Brussels Declaration matters is because it is a unique, twenty-point blueprint for a new set of ethics & principles to inform work at the boundary between science, society and policy. Its strength lies in its five-year reflection period, the robustness of twenty-five preparatory workshops and above all, the diversity of its contributors with over 350 draftees and 3000 reviewers. With over five million views already, it makes the case for a multi-disciplinary approach to policy encouraging greater integrity and accountability amongst all stakeholders.