Towards Ethics & Principles of Science-Policy Making

CLICK HERE TO VIEW OUR REPOSITORY OF THOUGHT-LEADER ESSAYS

As we now approach our concluding, multi-stakeholder engagement meeting in Manchester, we would like to reiterate some of the core principles and thinking around this five-year experiment, while updating you on our working process, the programme and participants for Sunday 24th July.

As the many thought-leader essays accompanying this series underscore, science speaks to politics, policy and power precisely because it has evidence (www.sci-com.eu). Our starting point, nevertheless, is that the practice of science has been re-shaped by endogenous and exogenous forces in recent decades. Public policy-making, too, has changed in a number of ways. Also, the context of these activities is itself evolving as global factors such as new market forces, climate change, public health, ICT and sustainable development influence domestic situations.

These three shifting arenas mean not only that science plays a more important role in informing policy, but that it must do so using ever more complex, contingent and contested knowledge. Claim and counter-claim of ‘evidence-based policy versus policy-biased evidence’ are hardly distinguishable. The number of stakeholders involved only grows – a good thing – while the ‘playbook’ at the boundary of science and public policy is constantly being re-written, but by who?

This fifth and final Consultation Event brings you together as a pool of 55 eminent thought-leaders precisely to craft Ethics & Principles to ideally better inform work at this boundary.

Our common goal is to revisit and revise the pivotal questions and key principles of science policy-making first established by twenty-seven eminent European, African and American-based participants in Brussels in June, 2012 under the leadership of Chief Science Advisers Dame Anne Glover and Prof. Patrick Cunningham.

Following the steps outlined below, on 28th September, 2016 we will issue a ‘Brussels Declaration of Ethics & Principles of Science Policy-Making’ synthesising our five years of open consultation and engagement, analysis and assessment involving over 250 groups.

Your findings will be submitted as a foundation document informing the first World Science Forum / International Network of Government Science Advice (INGSA) joint meeting being held in Brussels on 28th September to take up the challenge set-out in Article 4 of the 2015 WSF Budapest Declaration, which calls for:

“... The need to define the principles, processes and application of science advice and to address the theoretical and practical questions regarding the independence, transparency, visibility and accountability of those who receive and provide advice has never been more important … We call for concerted action of scientists and policy-makers to define and promulgate universal principles for developing and communicating science to inform and evaluate policy based on responsibility, integrity, independence, and accountability.”


What we need from you

You are to attend the full Consultation Event on the 24th July and beforehand to input just a few crucial, but original thoughts to your Pre-Working Group (detailed below). Please resist the temptation to data deluge by sending on links, articles, slides, corporate or institutional speak etc. Our revised set of Ethics & Principles must be as precise, concise, robust and relevant as possible.

As is our usual method, our Co-Chairs have divided you into five Pre-Working Groups under a Discussion Lead. These five groups match the five pivotal questions we set ourselves in 2012 and will help focus your inputs. Conscious not to expect too much of your time, your Discussion Lead will simply contact you to gauge your opinions and recommendations before the event. Every input is important. Then on 24th July, each Discussion Lead will be given 5 brief minutes to present his/her group’s ideas. There is a further 5 minute window for members to add ‘guru’ comments before our Chairs open the discussion to all participants for a further 15 minutes.

In the coming days, our Co-Rapporteurs (Aidan Gilligan & Jan-Marco Mueller) will assist all five Discussion Leads in gathering and synthesising your opinions and suggestions. They are also responsible for noting your comments at the Consultation Event itself. Then between 24th July and 28th September, our Co-Chairs will finalise the Brussels Declaration.


Back to top

 

CLICK BELOW FOR

PROGRAMME

10h30 – 11h00: Participation Required: Welcome Networking Coffee
11h00 – 11h15: Chairmen’s Address: Successes & Failures When Science Meets Policy
11h15 – 11h40: Science & Policy: A Crucial Relationship
12h05 – 12h30: What We Expect From The Policy-Making Community
12h30 – 12h40: Coffee Break & Group Photo
12h40 – 13h05: What We Expect From The Public, Industry, Media & Interest Groups
13h05 – 13h30: What Needs To Happen
13h30 – 13h55: Towards Consultation Group Recommendations
13h55 – 14h00: The Final Word


Back to top

WORKING GROUPS

Working Group 1:
11h15 – 11h40: Science & Policy: A Crucial Relationship

DISCUSSION LEAD: Prof. David Budtz Pedersen, University of Copenhagen

  • Carthage Smith, Senior Policy Analyst, OECD
  • Daan du Toit, Deputy Director General, Department of Science & Technology, South Africa
  • James Wilsdon, Prof. of Research Policy, University of Sussex
  • Julie Maxton, Executive Director, The Royal Society
  • Prof. Thadi Mgwebi, Director of Research and Director of the South African Systems Analysis Centre (SASAC) at the University of the Western Cape (UWC)
  • Pearl Dykstra, Member, European Commission, Science Advisory Mechanism (SAM)
  • Peter Gluckman, CSA to the Prime Minister of New Zealand & Chairman, INGSA
  • Satoru Ohtake, Executive Research Fellow, Economic and Social Research Institute, Cabinet Office, Government of Japan
  • Vaughan Turekian, Science and Technology Adviser to U.S. Secretary of State, John Kerry

Working Group 2:
11h40 – 12h05: What We Expect From the Scientific Community

DISCUSSION LEAD: Prof. Thomas Hartung, Johns Hopkins University

  • Anne Cambon-Thomsen, Research Director CNRS & Champion, ESOF 2018 Toulouse
  • Christopher Proctor, Chief Scientific Officer, British American Tobacco
  • Janusz Bujnicki, Member, European Commission, Science Advisory Mechanism (SAM)
  • Jean-Pierre Bourguignon, President of the European Research Council (ERC)
  • Lauritz Holm-Nielsen, President of Euroscience; Chairman of the Danish Nature Fund
  • Rasigan Maharaj, Deputy Director General, Department of Science & Technology, South African Government (BRICS Coordination)
  • Rolf-Dieter Heuer, Member, European Commission, Science Advisory Mechanism (SAM); Former Director-General of CERN
  • Vanda Lamm, President of the Ethics Committee, the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

Working Group 3:
12h05 – 12h30: What We Expect From The Policy-Making Community

DISCUSSION LEAD: Roy Robertson M.D., Center for Population Health Science, University of Edinburgh

  • Claire Skentelbery, Secretary General, European Biotechnology Network
  • Maria da Graca Carvalho, European Commission DG Research; Former Portuguese Minister for Science; Former Member of the European Parliament & Horizon 2020 Rapporteur
  • Michiharu Nakamura, Counsellor to the President & Former President, Japan Science & Technology Agency (JST)
  • Rush Holt, CEO, American Association for the Advancement of Science & Executive Publisher, Science Journal; Former Congressman for New Jersey
  • Theodoros Karapiperis, Head of Unit, Science and Technology Options Assessment (STOA) Unit, European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS)
  • Annette Verster, World Health Organisation, Department of HIV/Aids (TBC)
  • Andriy Klepikov, Executive Director of the International HIV/AIDS Alliance of Ukraine

Working Group 4:
12h40 – 13h05: What We Expect From The Public, Industry, Media & Interest Groups

DISCUSSION LEAD: Prof. Kathryn O’Hara, Carleton University

  • Andy Stonard, Esprit du Bois (Alcohol Treatment NGO)
  • Clive Cookson, Research Editor, The Financial Times
  • Princess Sumaya bint Hassan, President of the Jordanian Royal Society & Chair of WSF 2017
  • Mark Ferguson, Chief Science Adviser to the Government of Ireland & Director General, Science Foundation Ireland
  • Niamh Eastwood, Executive Director, Release
  • Rongping Mu, President, China High-Tech Industry Promotion Society & Member, Chinese Academy of Sciences
  • Seema Kumar, Vice President, Innovation, Global Health & Science Policy Communication, Johnson & Johnson
  • Stephane Berghmans, Head of Academic Relations Elsevier & Elected Member, Euroscience Governing Board

Working Group 5:
13h05 – 13h30: What Needs To Happen

DISCUSSION LEAD: Dr. Lidia Brito, Director of Science Policy, UNESCO

  • Francis Crawley, Executive Director, Good Clinical Practice Alliance; Ethics Working Group of the European Academy of Paediatrics
  • Imraan Patel, Deputy Director General, Socio-Economic Innovation Partnerships, Dept. of Science & Technology, Govt. of South Africa
  • Johannes Klumpers, European Commission, Head of Unit, Science Advisory Mechanism
  • Patrice Goldberg, Science Editor, RTBF (Belgian French-speaking Television)
  • Peter Tindemans, Secretary General, Euroscience
  • Robin Grimes, Chief Science Adviser to the UK Foreign & Commonwealth Office
  • Tateo Arimoto, Professor, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, Japan

13h30 – 13h55: Towards Consultation Group Recommendations

DISCUSSION LEADS: Prof. Michel Kazatchkine & Prof. Julian Kinderlerer

RAPPORTEURS: Aidan Gilligan & Jan-Marco Mueller

13h55 – 14h00: The Final Word

Dame Prof. Anne Glover, 2012 Consultation Event Chair; Dean of International Relations, University of Aberdeen; Former Chief Science Adviser to European Commission President Barroso; Former Chief Science Adviser to the Government of Scotland


Back to top

PARTICIPANTS:

Aidan Gilligan (Irish), CEO, SciCom - Making Sense of Science; Event Organiser & Rapporteur
Professor Anne Cambon Thomsen (French), Research Director CNRS & Champion, ESOF 2018 Toulouse
Dame Anne Glover (British), Dean of International Relations, University of Edinburgh; Former Chief Science Adviser to European Commission President Barroso; Former Chief Science Adviser to the Government of Scotland
Dr. Carthage Smith (British), Senior Policy Analyst, OECD
Dr. Christopher Proctor (British), Chief Scientific Officer, R&D, British American Tobacco
Dr. Claire Skentelbery (British), Secretary General, European Biotechnology Network
Clive Cookson (British), Research Editor, The Financial Times
Daan Du Toit (South African), Deputy Director General, Department of Science & Technology, South African Government
Professor David Budtz Pedersen (Danish), Institute of Humanomics, University of Copenhagen
Dr. Francis Crawley (American), Executive Director, Good Clinical Practice Alliance; Ethics Working Group of the European Academy of Paediatrics
Imraan Patel (South African), Deputy Director General, Socio-Economic Innovation Partnerships, Dept. of Science & Technology, Govt. of South Africa
Professor James Wilsdon (British), Prof. of Research Policy, University of Sussex
Dr. Jan-Marko Mueller (German), European Commission, Policy Officer, Science Advisory Mechanism & Meeting Co-Rappateur
Professor Janusz Bujnicki (Polish), Member, European Commission, Science Advisory Mechanism (SAM); Head, Laboratory of Bioinformatics and Protein Engineering International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology
Professor Jean-Pierre Bourguignon (French), President of the European Research Council (ERC)
Johannes Klumpers (German), European Commission, Head of Unit, Science Advisory Mechanism
Professor Julian Kinderlerer (South African), University of Cape Town & Immediate Past President, European Group in Ethics in Science & New Technologies (EGE)
Dr. Julie Maxton (British), Executive Director, The Royal Society
Professor Kathryn O'Hara (Canadian), Professor of science broadcast journalism at Carleton University; President of the Canadian Science Writers’ Association; Board Member, World Federation of Science Journalists
Professor Lauritz Holm Nielson (Danish), President of Euroscience; Chairman of the Danish Nature Fund; Former Rector, Aarhus University
Dr. Lidia Brito (Mozambique), Director of Science Policy & Sustainability, UNESCO's Latin American & The Carribean Regional Office; Former Science Minister of Mozambique
Dr. Maria da Graca Carvalho (Portugeuse), European Commission, Research Directorate; Former Member of Cabinet Moedas; Former Minister for Science; Former Member of the European Parliament (MEP) & Horizon 2020 Rapporteur
Professor Mark Ferguson (Irish), Chief Science Adviser to the Government of Ireland & Director General, Science Foundation Ireland
Professor Michel Kazatchkine M.D. (French), UN, Secretary General's Special Envoy on HIV/AIDS; Global Commission on Drug Policy; Former Executive Director, The Global Fund
Dr. Michiharu Nakamura (Japanese), Counselor to the President & Former President, Japan Science & Technology Agency (JST)
Patrice Goldberg (Belgian), Science Editor, RTBF (Belgian French-speaking Television)
Sir Peter Gluckman M.D. (New Zealander), Chief Science Adviser to the Prime Minister of New Zealand & Chairman, International Network for Global Science Advice to Governments
Dr. Peter Tindemans (Dutch), Secretary General, Euroscience
Rasigan Maharaj (South African), Deputy Director General, Department of Science & Technology, South African Government (BRICS Coordination)
Professor Robin Grimes (British), Chief Science Adviser to the UK Foreign & Commonwealth Office
Dr. Rolf-Dieter Heuer (German), Member, European Commission, Science Advisory Mechanism (SAM); Former Director-General of CERN
Dr. Rongping Mu (Chinese), President, China High-Tech Industry Promotion Society & Member, Chinese Academy of Sciences
Roy Robertson M.D. (British), Center for Population Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh
Dr. Rush Holt (American), CEO, Association for the Advancement of Science & Executive Publisher, Science Journal; Former U.S. Congressman
Dr. Satoru Ohtake (Japanese), Executive Research Fellow, Economic and Social Research Institute, Cabinet Office, Government of Japan
Seema Kumar (Indian), Vice President, Innovation, Global Health & Science Policy Communication, Johnson & Johnson
Dr. Stephane Berghmans (Dutch), Head of Academic Relations Elsevier & Elected Member, Euroscience Governing Board
Professor Tateo Arimoto (Japanese), Professor, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, Japan
Dr. Theodoros Karapiperis (Greek), Head of Unit, Science and Technology Options Assessment (STOA) Unit, European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS)
Dr. Thomas Hartung (German), Professor & Chair of Evidence-Based Toxicology; Director, Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Dept. of Environmental Health Sciences
Professor Vanda Lamm (Hungarian), President of the Ethics Committee, the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (MTA)
Dr. Vaughan Turekian (American), Science and Technology Adviser to U.S. Secretary of State, John Kerry
Dr. Andriy Klepikov (Ukranian), Executive Director of the International HIV/AIDS Alliance of Ukraine
Professor Pearl Dykstra (Dutch), Member, European Commission, Science Advisory Mechanism (SAM); Prof. of Empirical Sociology, University of Rotterdam; vice President of the Royal Academy of Arts & Sciences
Professor Thandi Mgwebi (South African), Department of Science & Technology, South African Government
Professor Luke Georghiou (British), Vice President for Research & Innovation, University of Manchester & Co-Champion, ESOF 2016
Dr. Kazuyoshi Kashimida (Japanese), Japan Science & Technology Agency
Laura Greenhalgh (British), News Editor, Research Europe
Iris Kisjes (Dutch), Senior Corporate Relations Manager, Elsevier
Professor Mogens Thomsen (Danish), ESOF 2018 Toulouse Scientific Adviser
Professor Carl-Johan Sundberg M.D. (Swedish), Head of Bioentrepreneurship, Karolinska Institute & ESOF Founder
Dr. Tom Wang (American), Chief International Officer, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
Dr. Miyoko Wantanabe (Japanese), Deputy Executive Director at the Japan Science & Technology Agency (JST)
Dr. Julia MacKenzie (American), Director of International Relations, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)


Back to top

A Few Explanations on the Finalisation Process

To be as fair and inclusive as possible, in March/April we informed and invited every single participant from the previous four High-Level Consultation Events held at the South African Mission to the EU. This was also because the switch to a non-Brussels location during the key summer period might make it tricky for some.

In consultation with the ESOF Delivery Team and from our own knowledge of the conference programme, we then added some new faces in a second round, also ensuring that stakeholder and nationality gaps were addressed, while keeping our meeting to a maximum of 50 thought-leaders.

In terms of the ‘Brussels Declaration on Ethics & Principles of Science Policy-Making’, we 2016 Co-Chairs took the Fifteen Principles & Recommendations arrived at in 2012 as our version 1.0. We revised them slightly, also adding 5 new principles reflecting a more robust ethical stance.

On 14th June, this version 2.0 was then sent to the four past Chairs for comment, namely Dame Anne Glover, Professor Patrick Cunningham, Dr. Wilson Compton and Dr. Mary Baker.

Based on their comments, we arrived at our 3.0 version which was sent on June 28th, 2016 to the many past-participants unable to join us in Manchester, but who asked explicitly to be kept in the loop and allowed to still feed-in to the process.

Taking account of their initial comments, we are now attaching our version 4.0 for you to tackle in your Pre-Working Group with your Discussion Lead. This is where the real drafting work, discussion and refining begins.

Based on these historic participant inputs, your 55 person live discussions and the subsequent finalisation by our Co-Chairs and Co-Rapporteurs, our 5.0 version will be the one submitted to WSF / INGSA on September 28th, 2016 as a foundation document for their continued efforts.

Why This Body of Work Matters

Our 2012 initiative was, for many, a first experience of being asked to examine and quite literally help define the science of science-policy-making, a world perhaps too closed to scrutiny.

What makes this different from other similar initiatives is that our consultation is purposely grass-roots-up via a multi-stakeholder approach with everybody’s legitimacy being treated equally if they can back it up. Representation has thus always been selective, balanced, global and expert driven i.e. practitioners above rhetoricians and concrete case-studies above theories. No private clubs or bans applied.

Each year, we asked the group to suggest the next year’s follow-on theme. We asked for presentations given in confidence by experts working daily in the field. We put opposites together. We fleshed out the best practices and pitfalls involved when it comes to real-life policy-making.

Crucially, we choose public health and emerging harm reduction science as our generic focus because it clearly impacts people the most, is certainly the most emotive and contested and offers a wide-range of approaches to policy-making across the globe, often underpinned by the exact same evidence.

By narrowing down we could move away from the risk of philosophising and better put our finger on the pulse of how science does or does not feed into policy-making and why.

The aim was to encourage real engagement in a neutral venue offered by the South African government, while doing everything to avoid a top-down approach and pre-judging the outcomes.

Our direction of travel and group think allowed us to scrutinise policy-making via the case-studies of harm reduction science in 2012; addictions and their brain reward systems in 2013; ethics, integrity and the policy-maker in 2014 and regulating risk in 2015.

As we end this five-year experiment, we are purposely coming back full-circle to put our collective necks on the block, to put down in writing what we have learned, what we believe in most, and what we can advise others to follow. This is not easy.

Fully acknowledging our own shortcomings, our collective aim is to create a brave blueprint for others to take up and perfect over time. We have full confidence that the WSF / INGSA series of four workshops will continue our efforts to promote true openness and inclusivity, going beyond the usual governmental or institutional model of ‘who you might know, not what you might know’.

We thank you again for accepting our invitation to (re)join this important but often challenging initiative and leave you with some past quotes until we meet on the 24th July in Manchester!

Professor Julian Kinderlerer (Chair),
M.D. Michel Kazatchkine (Chair),
Aidan Gilligan (Organiser)

QUOTES

“Scientists should learn to stand up, shout up and when necessary, shut up. The voice of the rational middle ground should be louder”
Prof. Patrick Cunningham - former Irish Chief Science Adviser (2012 Participant)

“We need to drag all stakeholders out of their silos and force them to work together”
Dr. Mary Baker MBE - Immediate Past President, European Brain Council & European Federation of Neurological Associations (2014 Participant)

“Only by systematically holding our leaders to account for the promises they make can we ever hope to tip the risks balance towards reduced harms and save lives”
Dr. Richard Horton - Editor-in-Chief, The Lancet; Former First President of the World Association of Medical Editors (2012 Participant)

“Drugs have harmed many people but bad government policies have harmed many more”
Kofi Annan - Global Commission on Drug Policy

PRESENTATIONS & DOWNLOADS

Participant list - Click to download


Back to top